Updating the sid for sas dating a boy younger

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recent references: What can agencies such as the SEC do to insure us that something like Madoff's Ponzi scheme will never happen again? Audit II: Two more scary words: Sarbanes-Oxley 'WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE GLOBAL MELTDOWN' Also, possibly because SEC hasn't been doing anything, GAO has been doing database of problems in financials of public companies ...The redone plans were to align compensation with the health of the company and remove the motivation to fiddle the financial statements. Article from year ago that estimated 1000 executives are responsible for the majority of the current crisis and it would go a long way to correcting the situation if the gov. A possible explanation comes from part of a Boyd briefing from the 80s. lots of past post mentioning Boyd and some number of URLs from around the web referring to Boyd: Basically, at entry to WW2, US had to deploy a large number with little or no training ...and so they created a very rigid top-down command&control structure to leverage the few experienced & skilled individuals.Many organizations (that effectively were forced to outsource and go overseas) ...

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...

Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).

After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...

Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).

After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.

Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

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A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...

Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).

After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.

Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

||

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...

Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).

After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.

Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

||

A combination of demand for scarce resources far exceeded the supply and because the Y2K remediation effort was viewed as short-term effort, it became quite popular to outsource the activity ...Supposedly Sarbanes-Oxley also required SEC to do something about the rating companies, but there doesn't seem to be anything but this report: Report on the Role and Function of Credit Rating Agencies in the Operation of the Securities Markets; As Required by Section 702(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the problem was the repeal of Glass-Steagall (which had been passed in the wake of the crash of '29 to keep the safety and soundness of regulated financial institutions separate from risky investment banking).After the repeal, there were a lot of large (regulated) financial institutions buying up triple-A rated toxic CDOs and carrying them off-balance: Stay away from Citigroup from above: Using household terms such as "QSPEs" and "VIEs," Pandit revealed that Citi has more than $1.2 trillion dollars in off-balance sheet assets. to carry lots of things like (triple-A rated) toxic CDOs. Even though it should have never been allowed to begin with, this is another too big to fail scenario ... Citi had already won last year's "write-down" sweepsteaks with large tens of billions. bringing back $1.2T onto the balance sheet would result in declaring nearly a $1T in losses.Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of $137 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of $9.8 billion in 2002, $15.8 billion in 2003, $18.6 billion in 2004, $25.7 billion in 2005, $33.9 billion in 2006, and $33.2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

T in losses.

Refed: **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - **, - ** Here's a staggering figure to contemplate: New York City securities industry firms paid out a total of 7 billion in employee bonuses from 2002 to 2007, according to figures compiled by the New York State Office of the Comptroller. it didn't mention that was still significant spike from before all the fancy dealing (responsible for the current mess) started.

Let's break that down: Wall Street honchos earned a bonus of .8 billion in 2002, .8 billion in 2003, .6 billion in 2004, .7 billion in 2005, .9 billion in 2006, and .2 billion in 2007. Enron and Worldcom had been laid at the door of deregulation, and Sarbanes-Oxley was suppose to correct a lot of that; placing a lot of responsibility on SEC.

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